Walking, running, hiking and climbing

Walking – Kenmare is a walkers' paradise and caters for every level of walking enthusiast. Walking the mountains around Kenmare are one of the most rewarding activities you could imagine. Every step seems to bring a different view and there are many fantastic routes of which include ‘The Kerry Way’ and Beara Way. The Kenmare Walking club has its own website where you can find details of walks and walking events planned for the year. Many walks are possible in the area and are well signposted.

Old Kenmare Road - This is a popular hike with locals and visitors alike. The full walk extends 16km from Kenmare to the Torc Waterfall car park in Killarney National Park. There are two shorter options which we describe in the text. The full walk will take about 5 hours. Walkers should be reasonably fit and equipped with walking boots and waterproofs.

Gortamullen Circuit - This is a 3.3km circuit to the north west of the town. It is good for running or walking. The route is a mixture of busier main road and quiet secondary road. There is a mix of terrain.

Gleninchaquin Park - Gleninchaquin Park provides breath-taking landscapes and scenery in which it is a sheer delight to wander around over streams with log bridges, mountain paths with carved steps, through rock passages, along glens and lakes to higher altitude. Marvel at the view overlooking the lakes, delicate green meadows, a spectacular 140 metre high waterfall, woodlands and Kenmare Bay, all framed by the Killarney McGillicuddy Reeks along the horizon provides breath-taking landscapes and scenery in which it is a sheer delight to wander around over streams with log bridges, mountain paths with carved steps, through rock passages, along glens and lakes to higher altitude. Marvel at the view overlooking the lakes, delicate green meadows, a spectacular 140 metre high waterfall, woodlands and Kenmare Bay, all framed by the Killarney McGillicuddy Reeks along the horizon

Bonane Heritage Park - At Bonane Heritage Park there are several archaeological treasures all of which are accessible along 2000 metres of gravelled walkway, each having its own interpretive board and story to tell. What it does demonstrate is that Bonane, as a community, has been settled for over 5000 years. Amongst the sites are •Ancient Stone Circle (known locally as the Judge and Jury because there are 13 stones) •Fulacht Fiadh (literally meaning 'cooking pot') •Bullaun Stone (said to have held water that was used for medicinal purposes) •Standing Stone (an astrological symbol perhaps) •Ringfort (known as a Fairy Fort in Irish legend) •Famine House Ruins (abandoned during the potato crop failure of the 1840s)

Kenmare Old Circuit - This is a short 2.5km circuit to the south of the town - good for a walk or quick run in daylight. Mixed terrain but nothing too steep or demanding.

Round Roughty - This circuit takes its name from the Roughty (pronounced rook-ti) river which flows through the Kilgarvan valley to Kenmare. This run/walk is about 7.5km. It is a popular circuit with locals. The route is a mix of primary and secondary road with mixed terrain.

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